Thursday, September 17, 2015

Homemade Whole Wheat Bread


(recipe from Foodie Gone Healthy)

Makes appx. 4 loaves
(Easiest, yummiest bread ever! There is nothing like homemade bread!)

4 c  warm water (approx 110°      
2 T yeast 
1 T  salt                                          
1/2 c vital wheat gluten (I get it at Walmart) 
1/3 c  oil                                            
3/4 c honey
1 ½ T dough enhancer* (I get it at Walmart) 
   7 c  whole wheat kernels, freshly ground to appx. 10 cups
      (Do not use more than 11 c. flour)

In electric mixing bowl (preferably a Bosch), with dough hook, place water, salt, oil, honey, dough enhancer, yeast and gluten flour.  Turn on mixer and slowly add freshly ground flour, 1 cup at a time, just till dough begins to clean off the sides of the bowl. You might want to add a cup or two of white flour to lighten your loaf a little if you are using red wheat flour or if your family is just getting used to wheat bread.  It helps the transition to whole wheat much easier!  Allow mixer to continue to knead for about 12 minutes.  Remove kneaded dough from mixing bowl.  Divide into 4 pieces of dough and place in 4 bread pans.  Cover with clean, lint free cloths, and let rise till double (about 40-60 min) Remove cloth and bake at 325 for 30 minutes.  When loaves are done, immediately remove from pans, and let cool on wire rack.  Place cooled loaves in plastic bags.  Freeze any loaves that will not be used within a couple of days.  

*Dough enhancer keeps bread from crumbling. 
**Gluten, Vital Wheat is the natural protein found in wheat. It contains 75% protein. A small amount added to yeast bread recipes improves the texture and elasticity of the dough. This is often used by commercial bakeries to produce light textured breads. Available in bulk at health food stores or kitchen stores.

To add flavor, variety and nutrition to your breads, follow the one-third rule: just add any grain to your bread recipe as long as you do not exceed more than one-third of your total flour.  For example, if your recipe calls for nine cups of flour, you can use up to three cups of any grain you want, in any form you desire.  The grain can be flour, cracked, cooked or whole grain.  The other six cups of flour must be some form of wheat, red wheat, white wheat or white flour and or spelt.

The formula:  1/3 grain + 2/3 wheat type flour = mulit-grain breads

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